Site icon Jake Ludington

Quicksilver

I’m one of those sci-fi junkies who fell in love with Neal Stephenson’s writing when Snow Crash hit the market as heir apparent to William Burroughs cyberpunk writings. Stephenson manages to take deliver an very evolutionary approach to science fiction, providing plausible scenarios in a lifetime just around the corner. Cryptonomicon, my personal favorite in Stephonson’s growing body of work, delivered a new twist, presenting parallel stories set in the past and present simultaneously. I’m currently engrossed in Quicksilver, an 800-page epic bending time on its axis by launching a science fiction adventure in the 1700s, showcasing the lives of notable English scientific thinkers, including Isaac Newton and Robert Hooke, as remembered through the eyes of Daniel Waterhouse. I’m less than halfway through Quicksilver and remain fascinated by the depth of detail presented by Stephenson, giving life to characters otherwise known only for their scientific contributions, as delivered by monotonous collegiate professors.

Exit mobile version