Site icon Jake Ludington

What the @#*%! is Audio data: Tag 5376?

Someday, I’d like to lock all the media player developers who log these ridiculous error codes in a room and force them to listen to Alan Parson’s concept albums until they can agree on meaningful error codes that make playing audio and video files the entertainment it’s supposed to be instead of an exercise in futility. How hard can it be to map Tag 5376 to something meaningful like ‘AAC file format’? Better yet, put some human context in the error message. I’d be elated if the computer would just say, “Hey stupid, this is not a DivX compatible file, try using the QuickTime player.” Companies might get sued for lowering the collective self-esteem of users who are already badgered about applying updates and checking for spyware and immunizing their computers from the latest virus outbreak, but at least we would know how to achieve what we want to do at that exact moment. If you’re reading the above error message, I’m assuming you attempted to play a file with a .mp4 extension in the DivX Player. While DivX supports MPEG-4 content, it can’t handle content specifically generated using the standard format of MPEG-4 video and AAC audio, for some reason the DivX developers use a blend of MPEG-4 and MP3 audio. The easy fix for this is to play the file in QuickTime player. An alternative solution is to download the 3ivx filter suite, which will allow you to play the file back in any Windows player which supports DirectShow filters, like Windows Media Player.


Someday, I’d like to lock all the media player developers who log these ridiculous error codes in a room and force them to listen to Alan Parson’s concept albums until they can agree on meaningful error codes that make playing audio and video files the entertainment it’s supposed to be instead of an exercise in futility. How hard can it be to map Tag 5376 to something meaningful like ‘AAC file format’? Better yet, put some human context in the error message. I’d be elated if the computer would just say, “Hey stupid, this is not a DivX compatible file, try using the QuickTime player.” Companies might get sued for lowering the collective self-esteem of users who are already badgered about applying updates and checking for spyware and immunizing their computers from the latest virus outbreak, but at least we would know how to achieve what we want to do at that exact moment. If you’re reading the above error message, I’m assuming you attempted to play a file with a .mp4 extension in the DivX Player. While DivX supports MPEG-4 content, it can’t handle content specifically generated using the standard format of MPEG-4 video and AAC audio, for some reason the DivX developers use a blend of MPEG-4 and MP3 audio. The easy fix for this is to play the file in QuickTime player. An alternative solution is to download the 3ivx filter suite (http://www.3ivx.com/), which will allow you to play the file back in any Windows player which supports DirectShow filters, like Windows Media Player.

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