How to Get a Free Kindle 2

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As I indicated in my newsletter earlier this month, I’m giving away one Kindle 2 at the end of April. I try to come up with creative ways to give away these various hardware devices and this time is no exception. There are two requirements to participate:
1) You must be subscribed to my newsletter on 1 May 2009 when I announce the recipient of the Kindle 2.
2) Between now and 30 April 2009, you need to write about your favorite worthy cause in a blog post or some other public way. Talk about what the cause is and why they need help. Be sure to link to the Website of your cause. Many non-profit organizations are suffering during the economic downturn we’re going through. Raising awareness will make a difference. After writing about your cause, email me a link to where you wrote about it. The cause you choose is entirely up to you. It may be a fund raiser for a school in your community through Donor’s Choose; you might promote clean water for a community somewhere; you may raise awareness about a program to help people get food and medical care they need; or you may opt to promote something else entirely. If you do not have an online space like a blog, facebook or myspace page, or somewhere else to promote your cause, you can write about it in the comments below (comments will close 30 April 2009).
The recipient of the Kindle 2 will be announced in the 1 May 2009 issue of the newsletter.

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26 comments

  1. I’ve thought and thought about this challenge. Being a member of a distict group leave me a bit shy about promoting it, but the good that could come from it outweighs my personal inclination to keep silent.
    I’m a paraplegic. I suffered a spinal cord injury on Christmas Day, 1998. Since that time, I’ve received much support and therapy from Craig Hospital in Englewood, Colorado.
    The good they do there cannot be praised high enough. They work witih both spinal cord and brain injuries. They teach people how to cope with the trials and frustrations they will face in the world of nominally healthy people.
    They also do research to find cures for paralytic injuries to the spinal cord. This research gives hope to the thousands of people who face the world that sees them as something less than whole human beings.
    The work the people at Craig Hospital do is something that should be praised and supported by the entire world at large.
    For more information, please visit Craid Hospital at http://www.craighospital.org/
    Thanks for your consideration.
    Eugene Humbert

  2. I would say that PBS needs our support. The produce many interesting documentation for the informed mind as well as educational programming for the kids. The quality of the kids programs are even better than the stations dedicated for kids.
    Due to the economy, they have been getting less funding. they are reporting loss of revenue due to less donations. Help them out.
    Now how to donate.. you will have to find out what your local PBS station. Go to the website I listed (http://www.pbs.org/aboutpbs/aboutpbs_support.html) and enter in your zip code for your local PBS station. I’m sure the puppets from Sesame Street will thank you.

  3. I want to put in a pitch for the Prostate Cancer Foundation. Prostate cancer and research into it does not get the press of some other cancers, although 1 in 6 men will get it. It is second only to skin cancer in frequency.
    The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) was founded in 1993 to find better treatments and a cure for recurrent prostate cancer. Through its unique model for soliciting and selecting promising research programs and rapid deployment of resources, the PCF has funded more than 1,500 programs at nearly 200 research centers in 20 countries around the world.
    Please support this organization and help put an end to this disease.
    For more information, you can visit http://www.prostatecancerfoundation.org/
    Thanks and have a wonderful day!

  4. There are not enough words to express how I feel about Ironstone Farm in Andover, MA and their program, Challenge Unlimited. Ironstone Farm uses horses as therapy for mentally and physically challenged children and adults. They work with people with all kinds of handicaps, from Downs Syndrome to Autism to brain injuries to people who have had heart attacks or strokes and need extensive therapy. Riding a horse for therapy is unreal…watching the progress these people make is incredibly rewarding. To see a child who has profound problems, throw back his head and laugh while walking or galloping around the corral pulls at your heartstrings in a way that is undescribable.
    Unfortunately programs such as these do not just happen, it takes a virtual army of help, an incredible amount of dedication on the part of the paid professionals and the unpaid volunteers (I am one of those). It also costs money, lots and lots of money to support these programs and in this economy, that money has become harder and harder to come by.
    Prior to this year programs were held for the most part out of doors, rain or shine, snow or sun. Finally we have an indoor arena so classes can be held at any time in any weather. A child with profound physical or mental issues is not well served by cancellations. They must have continuity to progress and so with some very aggressive fund raising and some very generous benefactors, the indoor arena was built. But this never ends,there is always something that must be done, horses need to be fed, there needs to be paid professionals and most importantly, there needs to be funds for scholarships for those families who need the therapy the most and who would not be able to afford it otherwise.
    I could go on and on–I love Ironstone that much and love what they do. But don’t take my word for it…..visit their website and if you can walk away without a tear or a tug on your heart, well, I just don’t understand how……..

  5. Kiva is a micro-loan group where members like you and I agree to loan an entrepreneur in a third world country as little as $25 to start or expand their business. So far I’ve made five or six loans, the first to a woman in Kenya who wanted to buy supplies for her small grocery store. Lidia paid back her loan and I re-loaned the funds to another person, over and over, adding funds as I learned tat these people do normally repay their loans.
    It’s great to give to a group that feeds starving children; we do need people to do that. I felt Kiva we equally worthy because if I can help those kids parents start a small business and become more self sufficient, my funds can help all their kids, not just one. Give a man a fish…
    By the way, I do NOT earn interest, the interest paid goes back to help Kiva continue operating.

  6. I volunteer for the local food pantry and serve as vice-president on it’s board of directors. We are a very small and very depressed town in Montana. About 20% of our population receives food from our pantry. Five years ago we began holding a Food Fair where folks would submit a recipe for our cookbook, then prepare a large amount of that recipe and bring it to the Fair. We sell “tastes” in 4 oz. portion cups and the first year we raised over $400 in 2 hours, $0.25 at a time. It’s so important not to let your friends and neighbors go hungry. We rarely know which friends need the help of a food pantry. Please, help to keep the shelves full and support the fund raisers of your local food pantry.

  7. L’Anse Creuse Public Schools Backpack Program
    Backpack Program History: The backpack program was started in
    December 2007 to address the growing need of local families and our
    students to have assistance during these tough economic times. A
    backpack of nonperishable food is distributed to participants on Friday to
    help supplement their nourishment over the weekend. The program
    continued during the summer of 2008 to those families that requested
    assistance.
    Impact: The number of students in the backpack program has steadily
    risen since its inception. The program initially supplied 37 students with
    weekend food packs. We now support 91 students and we expect the
    number to continue to grow.
    The Kindle2 would be a fantastic item to raffle off to our staff (we are in education)or students to raise funds for this cause.
    We do not publicly display this on our website, it is on our Intranet only for privacy reasons. However I have added a link to our public “help page” and on the right side of the page is a blurb about the program.

  8. Here are the links to the Web Sites for my and my wife’s fund raiser pages for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS). Through Team in Training program we have raised $11,000 for the cause and our team has raised over $500,000 through one event. We have also just completed our first triathlon the Olympic Distance Lavaman Triathlon ( 1 mile swim, 25 mile bike and 6 mile run) http://www.lavamantriathlon.com/; not bad for a couple of 50 year olds “Computer Potatoes” (an attorney and a tech junkie). Janice and I have dedicated our training to raise money for the LLS because of a couple of events that have touched us. Last year a friend and co-worker Mike Chisman at passed away with Leukemia; and our two year old friend Audrey Orr was diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    We continue to support the LLS and will continue to raise the banner and try to convert additional computer potatoes everywhere into raising money for LLS and getting in better shape at the same time!
    http://pages.teamintraining.org/los/lavatri09/chugener
    Janice has maintained a very good and blog “From Couch Potato to Triathlete To Help Make Cure Happen” of the training effort on her website:
    http://pages.teamintraining.org/los/lavatri09/jhugener

  9. I support Best Friends Animal Society which is located in Kanab, Utah. They are the world’s largest no-kill animal shelter. They work strictly on donations and help with animals and education throughout the world. They are celebrating their 25th year and have done a lot of good. If you are interested in learning more about them, the website is http://www.bestfriends.org/. Also, if you can get National Geographic TV, there is a show about them called Dogtown, which is aired on Friday nights. They believe that all animals deserve a forever home and that all can be rehabilitated to earn it.

  10. I support the Susan G Komen breast Cancer Awareness Campaign. It became interested in this charity when it hit too close to home. Cancer of all kinds run through my family but my aunt who was very close to me died of breast cancer. I stood by and watched as the Cancer ravaged her body and mind and the pain she experienced was often to overwhelming. I don’t want to see one more person go through this terrible disease one more minute than they have to. I believe we will find a cure for Cancer one day and any attention this group can get will help us get just one step closer. Here is the link http://ww5.komen.org/ Thank you so much for having this contest and bringing important charities to the forefront.

  11. I am a big fan of literacy programs, under the theory that teaching people to read is the most potent way to help them escape the isolation that can be caused by poverty or politics. Literacy is also one of the few gifts that is self-sustaining over a lifetime, long after the tools used to acquire the skill have been paid for. Because there are so many good programs, I choose one each year to support. This year I picked WELnepal, an organization that teaches women in Nepal, long excluded from the opportunities created by a formal education, to read. 100% of all donations go to the group’s literacy activities, and donations can be made through Canada Helps, at this website: http://www.welnepal.org/donations.html

  12. Hello,
    I am a student teacher in the Wheeling, WV area and there have been several kids in the local schools that have been suffering from cancer. One, a middle schooler that was about 12 or 13, recently died after only discovering he had cancer two weeks prior. My worthy cause would be the American Cancer Society, http://www.cancer.org/, in the hopes of finding a cure, or the Ronald McDonald House, http://rmhc.org/, because they are currently helping a local family that’s daughter is fighting this terrible disease.
    Thanks,
    Nick

  13. I have two groups that I support. The Gold Coast Down Syndrome Association is a wonderful chapter of the National Down Syndrome Association, they have great informative meetings, playgroups, information packets for new parents or expectant parents. I have been a member since my daughter was born with down syndrome and it has been a lifesaver on more than one occassion.
    The other group is Gods LIttle Acre in Florida they help handicapped or ill children. We have been going there since my daughter was 6 weeks old. They are always there to support the children and the families. I cannot say enough about their generosity.
    Wonderful groups, generous people thats what makes the world a great place to be and teaches us to give of ourselves.

  14. Hello,
    I feel a charity that is in real need of help is the American Kids Cancer Fund. Here is their mission statement:
    “American Kids Cancer Fund was founded to create awareness and provide financial assistance to families in need, whose children have been diagnosed with cancer and are undergoing treatment. Our grants encompass certain essential principles: helping the underprivileged, child-centered, family-focused, and participatory. Our goal is to be and create a positive experience for the parents and children that we serve, making sure these families and their deserving children are valued, have a voice and are not forgotten.”
    I know in the area I live there are several young people that are dealing with cancer currently. One recently died. It is a burden on the family both financially and emotionally and this charity helps to alleviate the pain as much as they can.

  15. In Tucson AZ, we have an organization that supports youth that cannot for one reason or another live at home. The idea is to help these young adults finish school and help them become self reliant individuals. Did you know that in Tucson 30 % of the youth in ninth grade will never graduate? Youth On Their Own, helps these kids finish school by helping them find jobs while living on their own. It supplies these kids with may items for daily survival such as clothing, free bus passes to get to work or school, and even house hold supplies for apartment living. I restore old computers and donate them so these kids can achieve equal levels of education along with their classmates. These items I have mentioned are given out free to these youth under a program run by Youth On Their Own. Major companies in Tucson also donate money to help our youth stay in school or even go to to technical schools after graduation. I feel the youth of our country is our future, and we need to help where we can.

  16. I feel that literacy programs are a worthy charity that we all should get behind. The charity that I would like to highlight here is First Book ,http://www.firstbook.org. The goal of First Book is to put books in the hands of children, so that they can have the opportunity to read. It is so important for children to develop a love of reading at an early age, because reading is a skill that is critical to their future success in school and beyond school, success in life. I would also like to suggest that anyone can volunteer at their local Elementary School or Library, to read aloud to young children.
    It is such a shame, that in the United States, that we have kids who are slipping through the cracks and are not living up to their potential. After all, what good is a Kindle if you can’t read!

  17. I support Donors Choose. As a public school teacher for 32 years (and still going strong), I know how budget cuts have hurt classrooms. I only received $600 to fund my kindergarten classroom for the year! This was all used for consumable items – pencils, paper, crayons glue etc. Many other classrooms face the same dilemma. Donors Choose helps me and other teachers get materials needed to improve the education of our students.
    I also support St. Jude. My oldest son worked there several summers ago. We took a tour of the hospital and were amazed by what we saw. My son was blessed by his experiences there. providing children the chance to improve their health without having to worry about the expense is truly wonderful.
    mj.coward[at]gmail.com

  18. With the economy in the condition it is in I am sure we all know that local governments are cutting cost everywhere. I have always donated to my local fire and police departments, but they need our support now more than ever. Every year our local departments raise money for local programs like toys for tots around the Holiday season or last year they did a program for visually impaired children in the community that helped a group of them go to a special camp. I have no link for you because every local department does this on there own. I urge you to seek out and help you fire and police departments, they try to be there when we need them, so we should do the same! Thanks.

  19. When I started to think about what I do that supports the millions of cause out there today, my list was long. I support many from breast cancer, leukemia, feed the children, and cancer in general. I have had 3 people in my family touched by cancer and it is by far the strongest one to me. However, I am most recently a friend to Onemillioncan.com. This site has their statement posted right out front: “On our own, we can make a difference in the world. But collectively we are a force for good that exponentially surpasses what we can do alone. Moving together, small sacrifices from each of us can make a huge difference in the lives of people around the globe.” (onemillioncan.com) Here you can contribute to any of the 7 causes they are reaching out to.
    The first is to be able to get clean water to African Villages. Unsafe drinking water is the leading cause of death among children in Africa. While 2 billion people throughout the world still do not have access to clean water. It costs only $4,500 to build a well for a village of 700+ people that will support it for the life of the village. Their partner is bloodwatermission.org.
    The second is for freedom and a future for the sex slaves in India. Millions of women and children are trapped in sex slavery and prostitution throughout the world. In India, the Sari Bari project is providing rescue and restoration to women and children through micro-enterprise. Currently, the Sari Bari project employs 25 women, providing help to repay the loans that enslave them, health care, scholarships for their children, and a safe working environment paying fair wages that provide an alternative to working in the brothels. The other partner with this project is wordmadeflesh.org.
    The third is to resettle sustainable villages for Ugandan Refugees. The conflict in northern Uganda has left thousands still confined to IDP refugee camps where living conditions are deplorable. Most of these refugees’ homes and crops have been destroyed. Together, we can create life-sustaining incentive to help resettle northern Ugandan refugees to war-ravaged villages by providing a well, two ox and a plow, a small thatched house and an out door covering for community services. Their partner is Africarenewal.org.
    The fourth is to provide bibles for people in SE Asia. This project will fund the multi-year process for translating the New Testament and other books for the Shatika and Rom people in SE Asia. Many in this part of the country are prosecuted and endure opposition which keeps them from being able to get books and teachings for them or their children. Their partner is theseedcomapny.org.
    The fifth is to provide life altering surgeries for children in the developing world. For just $1,000 a child’s life can be changed as a result of a curative operation to correct a disability and make a transformed life a possibility. Their partner is cureinternational.org.
    The sixth is to give hope and homes for former child soldiers in Uganda. Recent peace initiatives in Uganda have stabilized the situation and many former child soldiers are returning to the towns of northern Uganda. Sadly, many have no family waiting for them. Together, we can build five homes at Watado Village in Gulu, Uganda, to provide permanent housing and restoration for 40 children. Each home costs $30,000 to build and will provide long-term housing for eight children and a house mother. Their partner for this is watato.com
    The seventh and last project with this cause is to broadcast truth or recorded messages fro African/Arabic people. Where people can’t read, or printed bibles and books are restricted, solar powered players pre-loaded with the New Testament bring God’s story to people who would otherwise have no access to the message of Christ. Each device costs $50. The Sudan would receive 1,000 and the other 1,000 would go to the Arabic speaking world. Their partner is megavoice.com.
    While the needs of the world at times appear overwhelming, we must not be deterred by their size or complexity. The most important step we can make is the very first step. (onemillioncan.com) They are almost ¾ to their goal of $1,000,000.00 with some many projects and so little funds it’s amazing to know that the people carrying out these tasks are volunteers who just want to help and need the means to do so. If this project or projects don’t seem up your alley, I strongly encourage anyone to get involved some way some how. Whether it’s in your neighborhood or another country, people everywhere can use a little help.

  20. I would like to spotlight First Defense Legal Aid (http://first-defense.org/). First Defense provides an attorney to people that have been arrested and held by the Chicago Police Department but not yet charged with a crime. Because public defenders are not assigned to a case until after a person has been charged it is critical that those in custody are aware of their rights and have representation. The only program of its kind in the U.S., First Defense provides legal representation to those people who cannot afford it. It also gives legal direction and assistance to those trying to navigate the criminal justice system. The attorneys work on a volunteer basis and are on-call 24 hours/7 days a week. Any donation is greatly appreciated to help defer the costs of providing a hotline and legal services to those that cannot afford it. (First Defense does not take in any legal fees.) If you’d like to donate please go to http://first-defense.org/ for more information. Thanks!

  21. A group I’ve spent some time volunteering for is Centro Hispano in Dane County of Wisconsin. They do a lot of work for the hispanic community in the city of Madison and the surrounding area. They help hispanics find housing, educational opportunities and jobs. In addition they have a community center where they conduct outreach events to both draw in new members and raise cultural awareness.
    The piece of their work that I participated in was with the groups that they send to Mexico every summer to bring both educational and health care supplies to remote villages. While there the volunteers help work on projects for the community, this can entail repair work on existing buildings, helping to erect fencing or whatever other skills each volunteer might be able to lend to the locals. We also did some basic English language classes for those that were interested.
    They are a great group that manages to have a wide ranging influence both locally and in villages throughout Mexico. Any donations I’m sure would be greatly appreciated, information on how to donate can be found on the link below.
    http://www.chdc.us/invest.html

  22. Hike for Hospice 2009 takes place May 3 2009. It is a Hike to raise much needed funds for hospice palliative care. It will also raise awareness of the many challenges faced by hospice palliative care and to promote the phenomenal work that all volunteers and professionals in the field perform daily.
    I started volunteering with Alliance Hospice last year. It has been an enlightening and satisfying experience for me. It has opened my eyes to the great need for this type of work – end of life care, in the home. I see how grateful the recipients of this care are. That is why I chose to participate in this Hike and to seek sponsors wherever I could.

  23. There are many causes I support, but none is more dear to my heart than rescuing retired racing greyhounds. Many tracks are closing, something that is a double edge sword. It is wonderful that the lives of these precious sleek sighthounds will no longer be subjected to injury prone races-broken legs and possible death. They will no longer live in a 24 X 36 metal kennel with an exercise break once a day. They will no longer have to be isolated, lonely, unloved. Now, what will become of the thousands of dogs displaced by the closing of the tracks? I will leave that up to your imagination. There are many states that have outlawed greyhound racing. Did you know that greyhound racing exists worldwide? Some kennels are better than others, and I’m not hear to judge the kennel owners or business. My concern is the welfare of the hounds.
    There are numerous rescue groups throughout the US who take retired greyhounds into their organization to foster homes. Foster homes will teach the new pupper all about being a house dog. Basically, you have to treat them as a puppy. They don’t know a warm bed, how to play, where to potty, how to climb stairs and various other skills.
    One thing they learn really fast is the word “COOKIE”.
    I am a foster mom, although more like a foster failure. I had two brindle greyhounds of my own. I fostered many greyhounds over time. Two special needs dogs arrived at different times at my door. I knew shortly after their arrival, I would have to keep them.
    A greyhound is the most loving dog you could ever have and here are some facts that many people don’t know:
    They are 40 mile per hour racers.
    They are called 40mph couch potatoes.
    They do not need to be exercised in a huge area. They are great apartment and condo pets.
    Lease walking is a must.
    They are sighthounds and can see 1/2 mile away.
    They do not smell, shed or bark.
    They are like cats….sleeping most of the day.
    If you would like to learn more about greyhounds and adoption, go to There are many causes I support, but none is more dear to my heart than rescuing retired racing greyhounds. Many tracks are closing, something that is a double edge sword. It is wonderful that the lives of these precious sleek sighthounds will no longer be subjected to injury prone races-broken legs and possible death. They will no longer live in a 24 X 36 metal kennel with an exercise break once a day. They will no longer have to be isolated, lonely, unloved. Now, what will become of the thousands of dogs displaced by the closing of the tracks? I will leave that up to your imagination. There are many states that have outlawed greyhound racing. Did you know that greyhound racing exists worldwide? Some kennels are better than others, and I’m not hear to judge the kennel owners or business. My concern is the welfare of the hounds.
    There are numerous rescue groups throughout the US who take retired greyhounds into their organization to foster homes. Foster homes will teach the new pupper all about being a house dog. Basically, you have to treat them as a puppy. They don’t know a warm bed, how to play, where to potty, how to climb stairs and various other skills.
    One thing they learn really fast is the word “COOKIE”.
    I am a foster mom, although more like a foster failure. I had two brindle greyhounds of my own. I fostered many greyhounds over time. Two special needs dogs arrived at different times at my door. I knew shortly after their arrival, I would have to keep them.
    A greyhound is the most loving dog you could ever have and here are some facts that many people don’t know:
    They are 40 mile per hour racers.
    They are called 40mph couch potatoes.
    They do not need to be exercised in a huge area. They are great apartment and condo pets.
    Lease walking is a must.
    They are sighthounds and can see 1/2 mile away.
    They do not smell, shed or bark.
    They are like cats….sleeping most of the day.
    If you would like to learn more about greyhounds and adoption, go to Greyhound Rescue and Rehabilitaion…There are many causes I support, but none is more dear to my heart than rescuing retired racing greyhounds. Many tracks are closing, something that is a double edge sword. It is wonderful that the lives of these precious sleek sighthounds will no longer be subjected to injury prone races-broken legs and possible death. They will no longer live in a 24 X 36 metal kennel with an exercise break once a day. They will no longer have to be isolated, lonely, unloved. Now, what will become of the thousands of dogs displaced by the closing of the tracks? I will leave that up to your imagination. There are many states that have outlawed greyhound racing. Did you know that greyhound racing exists worldwide? Some kennels are better than others, and I’m not hear to judge the kennel owners or business. My concern is the welfare of the hounds.
    There are numerous rescue groups throughout the US who take retired greyhounds into their organization to foster homes. Foster homes will teach the new pupper all about being a house dog. Basically, you have to treat them as a puppy. They don’t know a warm bed, how to play, where to potty, how to climb stairs and various other skills.
    One thing they learn really fast is the word “COOKIE”.
    I am a foster mom, although more like a foster failure. I had two brindle greyhounds of my own. I fostered many greyhounds over time. Two special needs dogs arrived at different times at my door. I knew shortly after their arrival, I would have to keep them.
    A greyhound is the most loving dog you could ever have and here are some facts that many people don’t know:
    They are 40 mile per hour racers.
    They are called 40mph couch potatoes.
    They do not need to be exercised in a huge area. They are great apartment and condo pets.
    Lease walking is a must.
    They are sighthounds and can see 1/2 mile away.
    They do not smell, shed or bark.
    They are like cats….sleeping most of the day.
    If you would like to learn more about greyhounds and adoption, go to Greyhound Rescue and RehabilitaionThere are many causes I support, but none is more dear to my heart than rescuing retired racing greyhounds. Many tracks are closing, something that is a double edge sword. It is wonderful that the lives of these precious sleek sighthounds will no longer be subjected to injury prone races-broken legs and possible death. They will no longer live in a 24 X 36 metal kennel with an exercise break once a day. They will no longer have to be isolated, lonely, unloved. Now, what will become of the thousands of dogs displaced by the closing of the tracks? I will leave that up to your imagination. There are many states that have outlawed greyhound racing. Did you know that greyhound racing exists worldwide? Some kennels are better than others, and I’m not hear to judge the kennel owners or business. My concern is the welfare of the hounds.
    There are numerous rescue groups throughout the US who take retired greyhounds into their organization to foster homes. Foster homes will teach the new pupper all about being a house dog. Basically, you have to treat them as a puppy. They don’t know a warm bed, how to play, where to potty, how to climb stairs and various other skills.
    One thing they learn really fast is the word “COOKIE”.
    I am a foster mom, although more like a foster failure. I had two brindle greyhounds of my own. I fostered many greyhounds over time. Two special needs dogs arrived at different times at my door. I knew shortly after their arrival, I would have to keep them.
    A greyhound is the most loving dog you could ever have and here are some facts that many people don’t know:
    They are 40 mile per hour racers.
    They are called 40mph couch potatoes.
    They do not need to be exercised in a huge area. They are great apartment and condo pets.
    Lease walking is a must.
    They are sighthounds and can see 1/2 mile away.
    They do not smell, shed or bark.
    They are like cats….sleeping most of the day.
    If you would like to learn more about greyhounds and adoption, go to Greyhound Rescue and Rehabilitaion http://www.greyhoundrescuerehab.org/
    or my blog, Bookworms Dinner
    http://www.bookwormsdinner.blogspot.com
    Thanks for listening..Wisteria, Mystery, Lion, Webster and Wizard

  24. A local organization I would like to highlight is the Chattanooga Community Kitchen. Formed by area churches to provide for the hungry and homeless in our area, the Community Kitchen has been providing meals and services for about 27 years. One of the neat things I like about the Community Kitchen is that they help those who want to get off the streets with transitional housing, job services, substance abuse counseling, etc. They help address the issues that led to homelessness.
    While they are a “faith based” organization, rather than “preach”, they invite churches to come in, help with meals, get the know the homeless, and share their faith. The Community Kitchen does not make them “pay for their meal” by sitting through a service. A monk who felt called to join the work said he felt closest to Christ when he washed the feet of the homeless. They also employ the homeless in a variety of recycling efforts. They’ll take almost anything, from cardboard and plastics to old clothes they turn into rags. In so many ways, they love the homeless as people, not a project. They even have a special service every year to remember the homeless who died in our area that past year.
    I’m privileged to be a part of an organization which does an annual food drive around thanksgiving and almost 15 tons of food was donated this past fall. But, they can always use more funds and volunteers to continue their great work. Find out more at http://www.homelesschattanooga.org. Thanks!

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